Strathbogie Ranges - Nature View

Website of the Strathbogie Ranges Conservation Management Network

University of Melbourne

Wetland Vegetation

  • William Gubbins (2010). Vegetation change and the ecological effects of European settlement: a palynological and historical investigation of the Strathbogie Ranges, Victoria. Unpublished Honours thesis, University of Melbourne, Dept. of Resource Management and Geography. Part A (Introduction, Methods, Results), Part B (Discussion).

Fauna

Staff and students of the Department of Zoology, Melbourne University, have been conducting fauna research in the Strathbogie Ranges since ca 1994.

A variety of projects have been undertaken, primarily investigating the ecology of the Mountain Brushtail Possum (Trichosurus cunninghami formerly T. caninus), but also studies of echidnas, antechinus and macropods, in fragmented forest habitat in the Strathbogie & Boho South districts. These research projects are conducted under the supervision of Dr Kath Handasyde, Dept. of Zoology, who runs a field research station at Boho South.

List of Completed Projects

  • The use of corridors by wildlife, in a patchy landscape (approx). Honours thesis by Sharon Downes (1994)
  • The feeding ecology of the echidna, Tachyglossus aculeatus, in the Strathbogie Ranges, north-eastern Victoria. Honours thesis by Samantha Harrison, 1997.
  • The mating system of the Bobuck, Trichosurus caninus Ogilby (Marsupialia; Phalangeridae). Hons thesis by J. K. Martin, 2000.
  • The foraging behaviour and diet of the Bobuck Trichosurus caninus, Honours thesis by Cassie Wright, 2000.
  • Changes in the behaviour of the Mountain Brushtail Possum, Trichosurus caninus, during reproduction: an experimental study. Honours thesis by Eve McDonald-Madden, 2001.
  • The distribution and abundance of the Bobuck, Trichosurus caninus, in linear remnant habitat. Honours thesis by Christy Collins, 2002.
  • The foraging behaviour and diet of the Bobuck, Trichosurus caninus, in linear remnant habitat. Honours thesis by Lucy Ayres, 2002.
  • The browsing impact of the Koala, Phascolarctos cinereus, in linear remnant habitat. Honours thesis by Kris Carlyon, 2003.
  • Male behaviour associated with facultative monogamy in the Bobuck (Trichosurus caninus). Honours theses by Vanessa Keogh, 2004.
  • Behavioural ecology of the Bobuck (Trichosurus cunninghami). PhD thesis by Jenny Martin, 2005.
  • Bobucks. Honours thesis by Michelle Bassett, 2006.
  • Population density of eastern grey kangaroos (Macropus giganteus) along a forest-pasture gradient in north-eastern Victoria. Honours thesis by Simon Wong, 2007.
  • The social system of the bobuck (Trichosurus cunninghami): the influence of resource availability and habitat patch shape. Honours thesis by Michelle Bassett, 2007.
  • The influence of habitat shape and resource availability on the social systems of bobucks (Trichosurus cunninghami): an insight into home-range characteristics. MSc thesis by Inneke A. Nathan, 2008.
  • Individual and habitat variables affecting the reproductive success of male bobucks (Trichosurus cunninghami). Hons thesis by Stephanie H. Amir, 2008.
  • The influence of remnant shape and habitat quality on the Agile Antechinus, Antechinus agilis, populations in north-eastern Victoria. Hons thesis by Bronwyn Hradsky, 2008.
  • Home-range and habitat use in symatric brushtail possums (Trichosurus spp.). Hons thesis by Cristina Del Borrello, 2009.

Current Projects

  • Resource partitioning between Common Brushtail Possums and Bobucks. Hons research by April Gloury, 2010.
  • Impacts of habitat fragmentation on the dispersal of native mammals (Agile Antechinus & Bobucks). PhD research by Achim Eberhart, 2008-10

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