Granite tors below The Horn, with the High Country beyond.
Granite tors below The Horn, with the High Country beyond.

Whenever I visit one of the higher peaks in the Strathbogies, I look for distant landmarks, like Mt Buller, Mt Torbreck, or Mt Buffalo. There’s something special about getting a bit of altitude and seeing distant parts of the landscape, especially if I’ve been to those places in person and can picture exactly what that distant view looks like, close-up.

On a recent visit to The Horn, the south-westerly tip of Mt Buffalo, despite the hazy conditions, the higher peaks of the North-east were clearly visible (The Cobbler, The Bluff etc), but I also wondered whether I could discern my precious Strathbogies among the higher peaks and jagged skyline. I knew it wouldn’t be straightforward as we hardly have any peaks to speak of, compared to the rugged North-east. The information-panorama at the carpark wasn’t much help so I had to resort to back-bearings and recognition of nearby topographic features. After much searching with binoculars I finally thought I recognized a prominent peak on the distant horizon. There was a very familiar and distinctive-shaped peak at about 227º SW, but I just couldn’t place it. I knew that Mt Buffalo was virtually due East of the Strathbogies, so this peak had to be south of my home Ranges. Then I recognised it – Mt Torbreck, of course! Being steep sided and high (1510 m asl), it’s one of the few volcano-like volcanoes in NE Victoria. So, the low ridges to the right of Torbreck (from my vantage point) must have included parts of the ‘Bogies. Of course, it was impossible to be sure, but I reckon those hazy ridges on the western skyline were our hills. So, despite being several hours from home I felt warmly connected to those ranges across the hazy distance.