Agile Antechinus (Antechinus agilis).
Agile Antechinus (Antechinus agilis).

Whenever I see a dead parrot on the road, or any of the variety of other wildlife that occasionally is found deceased, I tend to think of the immortal words uttered by John Cleese in the famous Dead Parrot Sketch … “This parrot is no more. It has ceased to be. It’s expired and gone to meet its maker. This is a late parrot. It’s a stiff. Bereft of life, it rests in peace. If you hadn’t nailed it to the perch, it would be pushing up the daisies. It’s rung down the curtain and joined the choir invisible. This is an ex-parrot!”

There are no parrots in this post, but the daisies are doing well. This little fellow (above) was found dead by  Spring Creek Rd, Strathbogie, resident a few months ago. It’s a male Agile Antechinus, a small carnivorous/insectivorous marsupial that’s quite common here in the Bogies and across much of southern Victoria. He was scampering up trees and along ranches, under bark and falling logs. Now he’s just pushing up the daisies.

I was driving along Chapman’s Rd one sunny day in June when I spied a patch of feathers on the road, as if a down pillow had split a seam. But this was much more dramatic than a pillow fight. A domestic pigeon, aka Rock Dove, at least the remains of one, was scattered across the road. The leg bands clearly identified it as a homing pigeon and I duly registered it using the phone number on the legband. I was interested to find out where the bird had been released and whence it was headed – but haven’t heard a peep from them. Obviously and unfortunately for the bird and its owner, it became a meal for a local falcon, most likely one of  Peregrine Falcons that frequent these parts on occasion.

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A few weeks ago a friend from Boho South showed me a little bat that had come inside her cottage and was hanging on a rock-wall. Small bats like this one are rarely active in winter and usually spend their time tightly huddled with its brethren in a sheltered nook somewhere. This one found itself separated and ultimately died, most likely a combination of starvation and cold/exposure. A sad, but surprisingly well-preserved specimen.

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