The Longwood East-Creighton’s Creek fire burnt out of control for about a week after it started from a lightning strike on Dec. 15, 2014. It burnt more than 5000 ha of farmland and bush and destroyed several homes. We’ve probably all seen spectacular images and footage of flames and fire-fighting, but what of the impact on local flora and fauna, and what now? For many landholders it’s clean-up, or rebuild time. There are burnt fences to be removed and rebuilt, stock to be feed and anxiety to be managed – these will all take time.

And for the bush too, time is what’s needed for recovery. The fire, though clearly very hot in places, generally left a patchy burn. It burnt primarily the grasses, shrubs and dry litter on the ground and only rarely burnt the crowns of trees. However, most forest trees are now shedding their leaves, which blanket the ground and go some small way to shielding the bare soil and creating some sort of habitat for ground-dwelling animals.Here are some images taken during two visits to the fire area; the first on 30.12.14 and the second on 7.1.14.

15 days post-fire

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23 days post-fire

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