Flowering Sweet Bursaria attracts a cloud of feeding insects.

Sweet Bursaria  flowers in mid – summer in the Strathbogie Ranges. The fragrant flowers attract masses of bufferflies ,moths and other native insects which in turn attract insect eating birds. Bursaria hosts insects that feed on sawfly larvae (spit-fire grubs ) which feed on eucalypts . It is a nectar source for wasps that parasite leaf eating scarab insects and pasture grubs, generally within 200 metres of the bush. The thorny plants make excellent refuges and nesting sites for small birds . There is a buzz of insect activity around  our bushes today.

Spotted FLower Chafer (Polystigma punctata)
Spotted Flower Chafer (Polystigma punctata)
Sweet Bursaria is in the Pittosporaceae family , its leaves  contain aesculin , a substance used in the treatment of lupus, thought to absorb ultraviolet rays. European settlers apparently used it to prevent sunburn . There  has been an industry based on the collection of its leaves for sunburn creams and haemorrhoid treatment .
Pintail, or Tumbling Flower Beetle (Hoshihananomia sp)
Pintail, or Tumbling Flower Beetle (Hoshihananomia sp)
Fiddle Beetle (Eupoecila australasiae)
Fiddle Beetle (Eupoecila australasiae)