Paddling in the Sevens at Strathbogie

Could it be?

IMG_0959

Looks familiar.

IMG_1205A  rather content-looking Platypus  putting on a show for some very lucky visitors at the Bridge to Bridge Reserve.

IMG_1319Platypus are more common in the Seven Creeks system than you may think. Locals and visitors see them fairly regularly in various spots from Polly McQuinn’s upstream to Strathbogie and beyond. This one was spotted near Smith’s Bridge on the edge of Strathbogie Township by regular visitors (Brad and Callum) to the Reserve.

If you’ve seen a Platypus on the Tableland, get in touch so that we can record your observation and improve our understanding of these exquisite creatures.

More info on Platypus at the Australian Platypus Conservancy. And you can see where Platypus have been recorded across Victoria (including this sighting) at platypusSPOT. or on the Atlas of Living Australia.

Posted in Animals | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Strathbogies from Mt Buffalo

Granite tors below The Horn, with the High Country beyond.

Granite tors below The Horn, with the High Country beyond.

Whenever I visit one of the higher peaks in the Strathbogies, I look for distant landmarks, like Mt Buller, Mt Torbreck, or Mt Buffalo. There’s something special about getting a bit of altitude and seeing distant parts of the landscape, especially if I’ve been to those places in person and can picture exactly what that distant view looks like, close-up.

On a recent visit to The Horn, the south-westerly tip of Mt Buffalo, despite the hazy conditions, the higher peaks of the North-east were clearly visible (The Cobbler, The Bluff etc), but I also wondered whether I could discern my precious Strathbogies among the higher peaks and jagged skyline. I knew it wouldn’t be straightforward as we hardly have any peaks to speak of, compared to the rugged North-east. The information-panorama at the carpark wasn’t much help so I had to resort to back-bearings and recognition of nearby topographic features. After much searching with binoculars I finally thought I recognized a prominent peak on the distant horizon. There was a very familiar and distinctive-shaped peak at about 227º SW, but I just couldn’t place it. I knew that Mt Buffalo was virtually due East of the Strathbogies, so this peak had to be south of my home Ranges. Then I recognised it – Mt Torbreck, of course! Continue reading

Posted in geology, Strathbogie | Tagged , , | Leave a comment

Flash Floods in Hughes Creek

IMG_4981IMG_4983IMG_4984IMG_4982

Severe thunder storms dropping  around  80mm of rainfall in an  hour caused flash flooding along the Hughes Creek and Whiteheads Creek  near Seymour on 3rd January 2016. The  damage shown  in these photographs occurred between Bungle Boori and Kulaba  where gullies dropping steeply from the Waggs Range became gushing watercourses carrying silt and woody debris over the Hughes Creek Road  and into the Hughes Creek. Netting fences were destroyed as they  filled with leaves and branches creating barriers. Bare hillsides are very venerable to these violent weather events. Tons of fresh sand and silt has been dumped into this environmentally  sensitive section of the Hughes Creek. Macquarie Perch populations breed nearby. Mitchell Shire workers quickly cleared the roadways. Unfortunately one person lost his life while trying to cross the flooded Whiteheads Creek that night. Please be careful driving during flash floods. 

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Slow recovery from 2014 bushfires

IMG_2859IMG_2861IMG_2860IMG_2863IMG_2862

IMG_4928IMG_4933IMG_4930IMG_4931IMG_4929

Twelve months have passed since we set up photo points in the Creightons Creek fire area. Very little regeneration of native vegetation or pasture grasses has occurred at this site. The harsh seasons post fire , grazing by stock and native animals and grasshopper plagues have left this site as bare as it was one year ago.  

Posted in European history, Habitat, Ruffy | Tagged | Leave a comment

The History of Native Fish in the Upper Goulburn Catchment.

Hughes Creek Catchment Collaborative ( landcare network )  invites you to an evening with  native fish expert Will Trueman .

Thursday 22nd October 2015  starting. 8 pm @ Old Ruffy Primary School  . Nolans Road  Ruffy contact Janet Hagen 57904268 .

Will Trueman is passionate about restoring native fish habitat . He has spent a lifetime exploring our creeks and researching the history of  trout cod , macquarie perch and murray cod populations in the upper Goulburn

He is the author of “True Tales of Trout Cod: River histories of the Murray Darling Basin. Will is very interested in the native fish of the Hughes Creek and Seven Creeks . He has collected  historial photographs and interviewed  many of the pioneer families and older fisherman to build a picture of the changes in our river systems since first settlement.

image

Bring your fishing stories or photographs to share with the group .

Posted in Uncategorized | Leave a comment

Extreme Restoration

Sorting seed 50 kg  seed  27 species

Sorting seed: 50 kg seed, 27 species

Recipe for grassland restoration

  1. Scrape 150 mm of top soil off 1 hectare of paddock with a large grader
  2. Rough the surface up a bit with a cultivator
  3. Spread 50 kg of native grass and wildflower seed evenly over the whole surface.
  4. Spray the Seedbed with smoke water.
  5. Stand back and wait for rain

Sounds easy doesn’t it?

This is the recipe we have been following in partnership with the Euroa Arboretum as part of their Grassy Woodland Restoration Project.

If you are interested in learning more about this method of grassy ground cover Continue reading

Posted in Community Event, Ground layer plants | Leave a comment

Platypus Picnics

I collect Waterwatch samples from the “Boat Hole” on the Hughes Creek each month and every time I visit I linger to catch a glimpse of the pair of platypus that inhabit that area.
If you are looking for quite picnic spot take your chairs, a book and some refreshments this is a great place. Sit very still on the banks and enjoy the wildlife attracted to this scenic reserve. A camera and binoculars would be useful. Only 2.5 kms from the Ruffy Store. Follow the gravel road from the shop- Turn off Nolans Road down the Boathole Road.
IMG_4515 IMG_4511Nolans
The Platypus forage along the far bank towards Mrs Threlfalls fence, they are nearly always present. Let me know if you see them.

Posted in Mammals, Uncategorized | Tagged | 1 Comment